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Tec Dive Sites

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Here are the most popular Tec dives around the Maltese Islands with depths ranging from 35mt to 100mt+

Note that not all divers can visit all dive sites since qualification and experience requirements apply for safety reasons. Learn more about the qualifications required by viewing the specific information provided on the map for each individual site.

Hover over the map here below to view more information about the individual sites: 


   

shore dives boat dives

Blehneim Bomber Plane - Offshore SE Malta
Vintage photo during WWII flying in combat formation

Blehneim Bomer

The Blenheim Bomber is a mysterious plane wreck that served the British army during WWII. Its history is unclear but due to its location we do know that this 17 meter wide plane was shot down in its approach to Malta. Engine, wings, propellers and pilot seat can still be seen, but many parts are unrecognizable. The front of the cabin was separated from the wreck when it hit the water and now lies just a few meters before the wreck which sits on a sandy bottom. It is common to find a discreet current on the site so divers must be well prepared and fit for the dive.


Minimum certification: Deep Diver Spec
Max depth: 42mt
Entry: Boat
Snack Bar: No


HMS Stubborn (P238) Submarine - Offshore Mellieha
Sunk on 30 April 1946 as an ASDIC target off Malta

HMS Stubborn

HMS Stubborn was an S-class submarine of the Royal Navy, and part of the Third Group built of that class. She was built by Cammell Laird and launched on 11 November 1942.

Stubborn survived the Second World War but was not fit to repair so eventually she was stripped down from important equipment, instruments, armaments & periscopes before being sunk on 30 April 1946 and used for ASDIC target by the British Board of Invention and Research to train naval officers listening on sonar devices and detecting the presence of submarines.

Nowadays this wreck is in magnificent condition lying upright with a 10 degree list toward starboard side.

The three escape hatches are open however it is very difficult to enter inside; the widest hatch is only 60 cms in diameter with heavy sedimentation inside.


Minimum certification: Tec Deep
Max depth: 55mt
Entry: Boat
Snack Bar: No


HMS Southwold Hunt Class Destroyer - Offshore Marsascala
HMS Southwold had a crew of 168 men and carried 3 x 2 barrel 4” guns one at the bow and 2 aft sections.

HMS Southwold

This Hunt Class destroyer was built by White and launched on the 25th May 1941. On 20th March 1942 She left Alexandria as an escort to convoy MW10 to Malta under the command of Admiral Philip Vian. On the morning of 24th March 1942, while trying to tow a Merchant ship to back to port a mile away from Malta, hit a mine which exploded under the engine room. The midship portion gradually sank lower and the ship began to work with the swell. She was then abandoned, started to settle with considerable sag and sank in two parts

Nowadays HMS Southwold lies in two sections. The bow section is the largest piece, right up to the engine room approximately 40 metres in length and is at a depth of 72 metres tilted on its starboard side.


Minimum certification: Tec Trimix 65
Max depth: Stern 62mt, Bow 72mt
Entry: Boat
Snack Bar: No


HMS Russel Duncan-class Battleship - Offshore Grand Harbour
"she struck two mines that had been laid by the German submarine U-73"

HMS Russel

HMS Russell was commissioned at Chatham Dockyard on 19 February 1903 for service in the Mediterranean Fleet, in which she served until April 1904. After the conclusion of the Dardanelles Campaign, Russell stayed on in the eastern Mediterranean. She was steaming off Malta early on the morning of 27 April 1916 when she struck two mines that had been laid by the German submarine U-73. Battle ship was wounded badly and sank slowly, allowing most of her crew to escape, however a total of 27 officers and 98 ratings were lost.

Today the HMS RUSSELL lies at a depth of 113/115 metres and was dived upon for the first time in July 2003 by a British technical diving team. She lies completly upside down, with the stern section missing. It is believed that most of the large guns maybe lying on the sea bed as these were only placed on the deck.


Minimum certification: Tec Trimx
Max depth: 116mt
Entry: Boat
Snack Bar: No


SS Luciston Collier - Offshore Delimara
The Luciston sunk on the 29th November 1916 by a mine laid by UC 22

SS Luciston Collier

Luciston SS was one of the Colliers,( cargo ships that carried coal) which were used to transport coal between ports and to refuel coal burning ships. She was on it ways to Malta carrying a supply of coal for Merchant and War when it was torpedoed and sunk by the German Submarine UC22 on 29th November 1916.

Luciston today lies at a depth of 104 metres lying on one side. Since ships generally never had names on them it was initally difficult to determine the identity of the wreckage and therefore the site was studied thoroughly.

Although visibility at such depths can leave a little bit to desire, certain distinctive features of the ship can still be observed including the gun which is still in place, the winch, rope bollards, ladder, the anchor, iron structures that have been extensively damaged and also the vent, that was used to clear the air in the engine room.The entire area around the wreckage is also scatterd with large quantities of coal that the ship was carrying at the time of sinking.


Minimum certification: Tec trimix
Max depth: 105mt
Entry: Boat
Snack Bar: No


Reqqa Point - Gozo
The clear blue water and deep steep underwater cliffs characterize this site

Reqqa Point

The dive start off the ruged and sharp rocks off Reqqa point so special care must be taken during entry and exit. The site caractrisitcs make it suitable for all level of divers having some shallow reef areas sloping to much greather depths hitting the 70mt + mark making a great place for tec divers as well. Apart the steep reef wall that extends all round the area the another two main features attracting a good number of divers in the area are the bottle neck cave (extending from 35 to 62mt) and the bilinghurst cave (with a maximum depth of 35mt). It’s important to remind all those wishing to visit this area that each diver must meet the required level of training in order to dive a specific part of the site.


Minimum certification: Advanced
Max depth: 50mt+
Entry: Boat
Snack Bar: No


Inland Sea - Gozo
A beautiful view of the shallow peaceful bay protected behind the high cliff wall

Inland Sea

Inland Sea is the name of a large circular lagoon of about 60 meters wide. She can be reached by walking, boating but also by diving from the sea inwards through a narrow 70 meter long open canyon. Entering the canyon is easy from the sea side where it has a height of 16 meters. But from the inland sea side the entrance in less than a meter. The canyon is about 25 meter deep under the water, creating a huge cave. On exciting the tunnel that connect the inner bay to the other part of the cave you will be mesmerized by the deep blue color of the open sea where the seafloor drops off vertically into the blue. No wonder Jacques Yves Cousteau included this site in his top 10 sites to dive worldwide.


Minimum certification: Open Water
Max depth: 70mt +
Entry: Shore
Snack Bar: Yes


HMS St. Angelo Minesweeper - Offshore Grand Harbour
Auxiliary British tug built by Scott Bowling

HMS St. Angelo

This was an Auxiliary British tug built by Scott Bowling and was used for harbour duties. Originally it served as harbour transport for Royal Navy Officers carrying personnel from Fort St Angelo to other destinations but during the war it was adopted for rescue and later on as a minesweeper where it eventually hit a mine and sank just out of the grand harbour. Today the Wreck lies at a depth of 54 meters and is considered hazardous for divers due to the high traffic of ships caused by it’s proximity to Grand Harbour entrance. This single shaft propelled minesweeper is a cracking little dive, with a telegraph and the hub of the ship’s wheel still in place, generator, sweeping cables and toilet.


Minimum certification: Tec Deep
Max depth: 55mt
Entry: Boat
Snack Bar: No


HMS Drifter Eddy Minesweeper - Offshore Grand Harbour
Sunk after hitting a mine on 26th May 1942

HMS Drifter Eddy

Built by A. Hall & launched as a dredger (or drifter) on 6th August 1918 she carried port duties in the UK. Prior to WW2 the drifter was commissioned in Malta to continue these same duties in Grand Harbour for the Royal Navy. In WW2, HMS Drifter Eddy was rigged to sweep for mines, even though such vessel was unsuitable for this job considering that back in the days minesweepers were mainly built of wood, while the drifter had a steel hull. Evetually it striked a mine herself on the 26th May 1942 causing a large hole in the hull on the starboard side which inevetiblly led to its sinking.

Nowadays, lying at 56mt in an upright position, the wreck holds a lot of sediment inside which reduces the visibility very quickly if disturbed. Most of its navigation equipment is still on the bridge although lying flat they still indicate the course the ship was heading to at the time of the explosion.Diving on this wreck is considered hazardous due to its close proximity of Grand Harbour entrance & ship traffic in and out of Valletta harbour.


Minimum certification: Tec Deep
Max depth: 56mt
Entry: Boat
Snack Bar: No


Hellespont Paddle Steamer - Offshore Grand Harbour
Sunk by German/ Italian aircraft the night of 6/7 April 1942.

Hellespont

Hellespont is a relatively recently discovered wreck, in 1999, off the Grand Harbour. Victim of the intense bombings on Malta during WW2, this old paddle steamer was built by Earle Shipbuilding Co, at Hull & was launched on 10 May 1910 and was based at Haulbowline Dockyard, Queenstown in Ireland until 1922. She came to Malta in 1922 and was subsequently damaged by Italian aircraft on 7 September 1940 and was never repaired but laid up at Sheer Bastion (Macina) where she was eventually sunk by German/ Italian aircraft the night of 6/7 April 1942.

After the war she was lifted by camels (salvage lifting buoys) and dumped off Grand Harbour where she lies today at a depth of 41mt.


Minimum certification: Tec Deep
Max depth: 45mt
Entry: Boat
Snack Bar: No


SS Le Polynesien Passenger Liner - Offshore Marsascala
Torpedoed on August 10th 1918 by UC-22 off Marsascala.

SS Le Polynesien

Built for "La Compagnie des Messageries Maritimes" at La Ciotat in France just like her sister ships "Australien", "Armand Behic" and "Ville De La Ciotat". The ships were quickly recognisable by their length, low profile on the water, and by their double funnels painted black. Also known by local divers as the plate ship, Le Polynesien was launched on the 18th April 1890 by Marie Francois Sadi Carnot, President of the Republic of France and in 1891 she started operating between France and Australia, through the Suez Canal. In 1903 they changed her route and operated between France and the Far East mainly transporting passengers to the French Colonies and eventually In 1914 it operated towards Australia and New Caledonia, before being dispatched back to Europe.

On the 10th August 1918 she was hit by a Torpedo from the U Boot UC22 and sank 7 miles outside the entrance of Valletta Grand Harbour with the loss of 10 people.


Minimum certification: Tec Trimix 65
Max depth: 62 / 76 mt
Entry: Boat
Snack Bar: No


Schnellboot S- 31 (E-Boat) - Offshore Grand Harbour
Struck one of it’s own mines while laying mines South of Grand Harbour and sank immediately.

Schnellboot S-31

The Schnellboot or S-boot ("fast craft") was a type of German torpedo boat that saw service during World War II. It Belonged to a sub-group numbered S-30 to S-37, built by Lurssen, at Vegesack. Launched 21/10/1939 and commissioned on 28/12/1939. S-31 had three Daimler Benz MB502 diesel engines producing 4800 BHP in total with a maximum speed of 38 knots and a range of 800 miles. The Armament aboard consisted of 2 x 533 mm torpedo tubes, 2 x 20mm guns including a cew of 24.

The Schnellboot S-31 was sunk on May 10th, 1942 just outside Grand Harbour in Malta, after colliding with one of her own mines during an operation attempting to sink the British minelayer Welshman. The Wreck was found off Grand Harbour by a team of Technical Divers on 6 September 2000 at a depth of 70mt.


Minimum certification: Tec Trimix
Max depth: 70mt
Entry: Boat
Snack Bar: No


Filfla - Offshore SW Malta
A panoramic view of Filfla from Dingli Cliffs

Filfla

This small, barren, uninhabited islet 5 kilometres south of Malta is the most southerly point forming the Maltese Archipelago.The name is believed to come from filfel, the Arabic word for a peppercorn. Filfla has an area of just 6 hectares and is a crumbling flat-topped limestone plateau surrounded by 60 metre high cliffs. Until 1971 the Royal Navy and Royal Air Force used the island for target practice. It became a bird reserve in 1980. The Filfla Natural Reserve Act, enacted in 1988, provided for further restrictions on access and use, including a prohibition on fishing within a nautical mile around the island due to the possibility of encountering unexploded ordnance. Access to Filfla is only possible for educational or scientific purposes and visitors, including recreational divers, must get prior permission from the Ministry responsible for the environment. The diving here is all about drop-off reefs, deep blue waters and the possibility to encounter large predators such as Barracudas and Tuna.


Minimum certification: Advanced
Max depth: 60mt+
Entry: Boat
Snack Bar: No


Fessej Rock - Gozo
A group of divers explore the reef

Fessej Rock

This lonely rock just outside Mgarr ix-Xini offers a beautiful naturalist boat dive. Fessej Rock is a tall, circular and vertical column of rock which rises about 15 metres (50 feet) above the water and plunges vertically 50 metres (165 feet) to the seabed, amidst a number of huge boulders. The average depth of the dive is of 30 metres (100 feet), and one encounters large schools of fish, tube worms and squat lobsters, dentex and amberjacks. Barracuda, tuna and grouper, as well as octopus and other lobster can be found on this dive.


Minimum certification: Advanced
Max depth: 60mt+
Entry: Boat
Snack Bar: No


Imperial Eagle Ferry Boat - Offshore Qawra Point
Vintage photo of ferry boat at Marfa jetty

MV Imperial Eagle

The ’Imperial Eagle’ was a ferry boat which originally was used to cross between the two main Islands, Malta to Gozo, carrying a maximum load of 70 passengers, 10 cars and goods during 1958 and 1968. For the next 20 years, it was then adopted as a cargo ship on the same route. It was originally bought to replace the world famous ’Calypso’ when the latter was donated to Jacques Yves Cousteau. On July 19th. 1999, the 43m long vessel was scuttled about 300 meters north east of Qawra Point. It now stands upright on a 40m sandy bottom 50 mt away from the Christ Statue - another "must see" place.


Minimum certification: Advanced
Max depth: 42mt
Entry: Boat
Snack Bar: no


MV Karwela Ferry Boat - Gozo
Inside the stern upper deck area

MV Karwela

The 50 meter long MV Karwela was sunk on August 2006 together with nearby ’MV Cominoland’ to help place Malta & Gozo even more as a top class diving destination. It’s easily reached both from shore starting your dive across flat rocks or by boat. As you can guess from such a recently scuttled wreck, marine life and fauna have not completely colonized the structure, but they will eventually lead to help expanding local wild life in such areas too. During the scuttle buoyancy tanks have been used to make sure both wrecks land upright which is how they still can be found today. She is located just of the coast from Xatt L-Ahmar and started in 1957 as the MS Frisia II, renamed to the Nordpaloma in 1977 before she came to Malta in 1986 to serve as a passenger ferry with a maximum of 800 persons and no cars.


Minimum certification: Advanced
Max depth: 42mt
Entry: Shore
Snack Bar: No


MV Cominoland Ferry Boat - Gozo
Picture taken during scuttling operations off Ix-Xatt L-ahmar

MV Comino Land

The MV Cominoland is one of the latest wrecks that was scuttled, together with the nearby ’Karwela’, by the Maltese government on August 2006 to even further increase diving tourism in Gozo. She started as a British Miner in 1942 and became a passenger and car ferry between Gozo and Comino. She could load more than 400 passengers and 10 cars and in all her years as a ferry no accidents happened. She was decommissioned due to old age when local authorities decided to scuttle here in front of Xatt L-Ahmar. Originally renamed from Minor Eagle (1968), Cominoland (1976), Jylland II (1980) and again to her final name the Cominoland, today this site offers a great dive to deep specialty and tec divers.


Minimum certification: Advanced
Max depth: 41mt
Entry: Shore
Snack Bar: No


UM EL FAROUD Gas Tanker - Zurrieq
Picture taken during scuttling operations off Zurrieq Reef

Um El Faroud

Built in 1969 this 110mt gas tanker, last owned by a Libyan company, was the setting of a tragic explosion occurred during the night of 3rd Feb 1995 while undergoing maintenance work resulting in the death of 9 shipyard workers. 3 years later it was finally concluded that the ship was no longer seaworthy and this contributed to creating another divers’ attraction and artificial reef attracting large numbers of fish. Nowadays the wreck is broken in two large chunks, after a severe storm hit caused it to separate, and is now home to regular shoals of barracudas and other pelagic fish. An engraved memorial plate with the names of the shipyard workers who perished in the incident is still visible on the main bridge today.


Minimum certification: Advanced
Max depth: 36mt
Entry: Shore
Snack Bar: Yes


Rozi Tug Boat - Cirkewwa
The divers descend on the wreck which rests on a sandy bottom at 35mt

MV Rozi

Rozi is a 40 meter long tugboat which was scuttled as a tourist attraction in 1992 by Captain Morgan Cruises whose original intent was to take visitors down to the wreck with a small submarine appropriately colored yellow. She is located at about 100 meters out from the jetty and is still fully intact except engine and propellers which were taken off before sinking. The wrecks sits in upright position on a sandy bottom attracting numerous fish and divers alike.


Minimum certification: Advanced
Max depth: 35mt
Entry: Shore
Snack Bar: Yes


P29 Patrol Boat - Cirkewwa
Divers descend on the wreck at a depth of 36mt

P29

P29, a Kondor Class former Minesweeper and Patrol Boat, was purposefully scuttled on 14th August 2007 as new divers’ attraction and artificial reef to encourage fish population to grow. The 52mt ship was built by Peenewerft shipyard as a Minesweeper for the German Navy and later served with the Armed Forces of Malta for over 12 years where it was involved in numerous patrol and border control operations. Both engines where taken out and the entire ship was stripped off all contaminates as an environmental measure before the sinking.


Minimum certification: Advanced
Max depth: 36mt
Entry: shore
Snack Bar: Yes


Bristol Beaufighter Plane - Offshore Sliema
Vintage photo during WWII

Bristol Beaufighter

(extract taken from the book ‘Call Out’, page 227 a wartime diary of air/sea rescue operations at Malta written by Frederick R. Galea).

"On 17th March 1943 at 1125 hours nine Beaufighters of No 272 squadron took off to escort nine Beauforts of No 39 Squadron on a shipping strike of Point Stelo. At 1138 hours Beau fighter ‘N,’ with Sgt Donald Frazee at the controls and Sgt Sandery as observer, began to vibrate violently and lost speed rapidly. There was no option but to ditch the aircraft and this was accomplished at 100mph in a slight swell about 1000 yards off Dragonara Point, Sliema. As all this took place close to shore, persons watching informed Fighter Control but Maltese dghajsas reached the crew some five minutes before rescue launch HSL 166 arrived on the spot. The air crew was transferred to the launch.”

The wreck nowadays seems to be just like an oasis in the desert for a large number of scorpion fish which enjoy the protection and the micro ecosystem that this structure provides.


Minimum certification: Deep diver Spec
Max depth: 38mt
Entry: Boat
Snack Bar: No


MV Xlendi Ferry Ship - 42mt
Picture taken during scuttling operations off Ix-Xatt L-Ahmar

MV Xlendi

The MV Xlendi was one of the early attempts to boost the diving industry in Malta by means of scuttling old ferry boats. The 80mt ship was used to carry passengers and vehicles between Malta and Gozo as part of the channel crossing service. The ferries were later replaced by more modern ships and the Xlendi was finally destined to end its days at the bottom of the sea bed as a diver’s attraction and artificial reef. Unfortunately the adverse weather conditions on the day of the sinking led to the wreck capsizing during the final stages of the scuttling and eventually landed on the sea bed up side down. This eventually led to the main upper decks to be buried and squashed by the shear weight of the hull above making most part of the wreck not safe to enter.


Minimum certification: Advanced
Max depth: 42mt
Entry: Shore
Snack Bar: No